Behold the Undead of Dracula is Now Available!

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Halloween is fast approaching. What better way to spend the coming weeks than delving deep into a macabre universe of classic movie monsters… with a twist? Lucky you, Behold the Undead of Dracula: Lurid Tales of Cinematic Gothic Horror is now available!

An affectionate tribute to the crumbling castles and lysergic psychedelia of ’60s and ’70s creature features, this new anthology from Muzzleland Press features the kind of bawdy, bloody tales that would make Peter Cushing, Roger Corman, and Mario Bava proud, but filtered through a modern lens. From straightforward homage to postmodern revisionism and self-aware metafiction, the stories in Behold the Undead of Dracula read like descriptions of lost Hammer Pictures productions that never existed, couldn’t have existed, should have existed.

My own contribution, “Diabolus in Musica,” is a riff on Dennis Wheatley’s devil-worship potboilers. It features a b-movie music composer who finds himself the victim of hellish visions and satanic machinations while trying to finish his latest film score. Check out the full table of contents down below for a taste of what the rest of my creepy compatriots have in store for readers.

Behold the Undead of Dracula: Lurid Tales of Cinematic Gothic Horror is now available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and the Muzzleland Press bookstore. Buy it so I don’t starve!

“Go to the Devil” by Matthew M. Bartlett

“Over the Violets There That Lie” by Gwendolyn Kiste

“George Strait and the Black Orchard Grimoire” by Mer Whinery

“Vengeance of the Blood Princess” by Dominique Lamssies

“Diabolus in Musica” by William Tea

“Taste of Fear in the Night (European Release Title: Curse of the Mountain Witches)” by Tom Breen

“You Should Smile More: The Blood Coven of Arkana” by Heather L. Levy

“Mina’s Castle” by Sean M. Thompson

“Cleaver Castle of Carnage Presents: The Coven Strikes Back” by Christa Carmen

“The Bloody Cask of Rasputin” by Thomas C. Mavroudis

“The Filthy Creation of Frankenstein” by Gemma Files

R.I.P. Sid Haig

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Like many horror movie fans who frequent the convention scene, I’m happy to say I had the very good fortune of meeting  Sid Haig. I actually did so multiple times over the years, because he was just so damn fun to talk to. Sid was a convention regular and always seemed happy to hang out with his fans. Above is a photo of him and I from back when I was a baby-faced college freshman.

Though best known these days as the crude serial killing clown Captain Spaulding from Rob Zombie’s movies House of 1000 Corpses, The Devil’s Rejects, and the recently released Three From Hell, Sid was an insanely accomplished character actor with a resume longer than John Holmes’ third leg. He was in such cult-classic flicks as THX-1138, Spider Baby, Galaxy of Terror (a major personal favorite), Foxy Brown, Coffy, The Big Doll House, The Big Bird Cage, Kill Bill Vol. 2, Jackie Brown, Hatchet 3, The Lords of Salem (another big favorite of mine), and Bone Tomahawk. .

Suffice to say, the man was a true workhorse. The quantity of his performances was matched, however, by their quality. Whether it was a Filipino women-in-prison b-movie or a Quentin Tarantino-directed Hollywood blockbuster, whenever Sid was onscreen you paid attention. Though some of his parts were small, even the biggest pictures he was in would’ve been noticeably worse without his presence.

Likewise, the world in which we live is noticeably worse now that he’s gone.

Con Report: Things I Did at (and After) NecronomiCon 2019

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H.P. Lovecraft’s birthday has come and gone again once again, and with it another trek to NecronomiCon Providence, a biannual convention for writers, readers, artists, and academics working in and around that tentacle-wrapped eldritch realm known as weird fiction.

This year I not only attended the con but also visited with some close friends who live in the area, and I took my mother with me for the purpose of treating her to a post-convention mini family vacation in New England. Altogether I was in Rhode Island for about a week, seeing the sights, eating delicious food, talking horror, blowing money on things I absolutely cannot afford, and just generally having a good time. I thought I’d share some of that with you now.

But first a note: Back when I went to NecronomiCon 2017, I wrote an exhaustive two-page write-up about the entire event. I’m pretty sure no one bothered to read it, and anyone who did was probably bored out of their mind. So for that reason, for NecronomiCon 2019 (and likely any literary cons I blog about in the future) I’m going to use the same format I used for my blissfully short StokerCon 2018 report.

Besides, let’s face it, my life sounds a lot more interesting as a series of out-of-context bullet points.

That said, here’s what I did at (and after) Necronomicon 2019:

I…

…picked up my contributor’s copy of Behold the Undead of Dracula: Lurid Tales of Cinematic Gothic Horror from Muzzleland Press.

…talked Zardoz, ethical cannibalism, and obscure leprechaun movies with Scott R Jones, Sonya Taaffe, and Teri Zin over steaming plates spicy squid and pork belly at Mokban.

…got to meet (and hug!) Farah Rose Smith, who is not only one of my favorite writers working today but also one of my favorite human beings living today.

…bought a Deep One fetus in a jar from sculptor Joe Broers.

…shared burgers and milkshakes at the Haven Bros. Diner with Christopher Ropes and Barry Lee Dejasu.

…rambled on about my love for the novel F4 to its author, the incredibly talented and kind Larissa Glasser.

…paid my respects to Sam Gafford and Wilum H. Pugmire at a special memorial event.

…met Mississippi Bones frontman Jared Collins, who inflated my already swollen ego by telling me he liked my story “Reset” from Terror in 16-Bits.

…attended a surprise late-night event by Matthew M. Bartlett and Jon Padgett, where the pair took turns reading the entirety of their new collaborative novelette, The Latham-Fielding Liaison (available for preorder now from Nightscape Press).

…geeked out about Japanese mushroom-monster b-movies with kindred monster-kid Orrin Grey.

…took a tour of the Lizzie Borden murder house, which is now a combination museum and bed & breakfast.

…went comic book-hunting at a local indoor flea market (I found some nifty ol’ Atlas/Seaboard issues for hella cheap).

…stopped off in New Haven, Connecticut, to indulge by pizza obsession by eating the famous coal-fired “tomato pie” at the original Pepe’s Pizza location on Wooster Street.

…made a new friend:

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